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industry. i was just wondering if you would talk a little bit about the environment and environmental issues. here in this country whenever we talk about new exploration, we're also talking about environmental implications, and we hear about disasters here. we don't really hear much about them in russian -- russia, though i'm sure they exist and can be quite massive. so i wondered if you'd just talk about that a bit. >> well, here we come to the guilty part of the guilty love. because i'm as conscious as everyone else that we are, in a sense, too clever for our own good. by the way, one of the unfortunate consequences of this bonanza that we are, that we have just, that we are now harvesting is that we are headed in all likelihood for an era of quite possibly cheaper hydrocarbons, and certainly very abundant hydrocarbons. that thing which is so easy for us which is to climb this our car and head to the nearest gas station is something that's going to get easier and easier and easier for the next generation. and this is very bad news for the environment, there's no question about that.
. for the environment. there's no question about that. fortunately in russia they don't have an environment. at least they have frequently behaviored as though they didn't have an environment. and certainly the oil industry has never meant particular -- been particularly concerned about the environment. i remember in the 1990s talking to the minister of the environmental science. he happened to be briefly also the ministry of agreology. i met him in the huge office. there were maps that showed radio active tam contamination. he was interesting. and id asked him about the environment. he said we don't have one. we can't afford one. it was very much the story of the 1990s. the signature of the russian hydrocarbon industry is very brief. it's absolutely conventional up to this point. and their investment in renewable and unconventionals is at this point. [inaudible] with one big exception in the nuclear power. they consider that to be a virtuous renewable. as for solar, well, the agency in charge of solar-power development is coordinated to the nuclear power agency which is tells you something. and so o
's not only bad for the economy, but hurt the environment as well. "varney & company" is about to begin. karen anjeremiah. they don't know it yet, but they' gonna fall in love, get married, have a couple of kids, [ children laughing ] move to the country, and live a long, happy life together where they almost never fight about money. [ dog barks ] because right after they get married, they'll find some retirement people who are paid on salary, not commission. they'll get straightforward guidance and be able to focus on other things, like each other, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. >> good morning, "varney & company," viewers. today is monday, january 7th and gerard depardieu, well, he's welcomed to russia with open arms and here, we're going to welcome with you open arms, with sandra smith and on the floor of the new york stock exchange, of course, nicole petallides. hey, you remember the cash for clunkers, that 2009 government program that gave people money, a the lot of money to buy more fuel efficient cars if they traded in the old gas guzzlers, as i
of russia being their sole supplier. in this environment, subsidizing wind and solar makes no sense. also five years ago, we thought that china and india, and other emerging economies, my sign-on to emissions reductions, and, therefore, that if we reduced emissions, perhaps global temperatures would be reduced. and i don't think it does but i don't tak take a position on whr mandated emissions caused global warming or not, but if we are reducing our emissions and china and india, which make up 37% of the worlds population, are not doing so, when i pointed any affect on the global temperatures. and then the first chapter of the book i talk about geoengineering solutions, that nobel prize-winning weiner thinks we can reduce global temperature if we just do it on our own. painting russ whitehurst like the sun's rays. what we are doing with a 12 and dollars were spent on alternative energy is pushing people into cars that they don't want to buy, we are raising electricity costs. we are -- we're getting rid of incandescent lightbulbs in favor of fluorescent lightbulbs. and the cost of this fal
they are going to be different given the political environment? >> in the past decades, cops have been marginalized, but after the revolution, cops have started to express their opinions freely. previously cops would protest inside the cathedral, but after the revolution they go outside of the state tv building. this is one of the positive goals. from my and i will try alongside all the bishops and priests to focus on the spiritual role of the church followed by the social role. therefore the political role will have no role left except to continue partisan politics. >> is it the tendency to try to pull the church out of politics? >> indeed, the church needs to remain out of politics. the church as a spiritual establishment. that is the primary role. it is also a social role to help with construction of services and schools and so on. >> banks are being allowed more flexibility in a crisis. they will have more assets that will be easier to turn to cash if they have problems. regulators still want banks to hold enough cash and assets they can sell quickly in case they run into trouble.
hikes, what the environment will be like in washington, especially with a lot of republicans they seem to be running scad. >> that is where just as mayor giuliani said, the republicans should not run scared, they should tell the truth, and get the facts out to the people. >> jim: but they are not doing it. >> they are not doing it. maybe the mainstream media is ignoring them, this is a simple message, if you want to government to grow at the rate it is growing, and you are okay with this big government you see, you have to pay for it, a lot more than we are now, and a lot more than hiking taxes on the rich, now, but they can't get through the noise. >> well i don't see much of a attempt to try to get the facts out to the people, i think that have to figure out a way to connect with the people and be able to tell them the truth. you know margaret thatcher said that the problem with socialism or kd of government that obama is trying tony flick o to inflat sooner or later you run out of other people's money. neil: we might be seeing that now, a lot of americans seeing payroll taxut makeo
need predictable and their regulatory environment. the federal government shouldn't pick the winners and losers, or subject energy projects to endless and duplicative views -- reduce. such roadblocks have stymied vital products, like the keystone pipeline, and that must be built. we shouldn't stop epa's -- we should -- shouldn't have said it that way. it's getting wound up a little bit. we should stop epa's senseless and ideologically driven battle to ban the production and the use of coal. and we should continue with the next generations of nuclear power plants, and we should waste no time in pursuing research that develop alternative sources such as wind, solar, geothermal, and deficiency. that is where we have led the world. by fully embracing america's energy opportunity, we can accelerate growth, create millions of new jobs, free ourselves from less than stable global suppliers and create huge new revenues for government, which will help reduce our budget deficit. we also have an extraordinary opportunity to create growth and jobs through expansion of trade and investment and to
mentioned, the things america needs to do to stay competitive in this challenging economic environment, domestically and globally? >> absolutely. first, you've got to get through the fiscal issues. balance in the deficit and budgets, number one. and then we need to get to tax reform. it is a big deal. there has not been a major renovation to the tax code since 1986, and that is before the internet. immigration is a big deal. getting the kids in school today studying the sciences and technology and engineering and the math to stay in this country and getting a path to his citizenship and dealing with the competencies' to grow jobs. if you can deal with those issues, we would be off to a great start. >> you have many of your clients in the manufacturing business. looking at the broader economic shift, what do you do in a post- manufacturing world to provide the numbers of jobs that america needs? because it does not appear clear yet. >> we have roughly 12 million jobs through the great recession lost. we have filled about half of those. it will still take some more between five-seven yea
the political environment now? >> in the past decades, cops have been marginalized but after the january 25 revolution, like the rest of egyptians, started to express their opinion freely. previously when they had problems would protest inside the cathedral but they now go to outside the state building. this is one of the revolution's positive goals. from my end i will try alongside all of the bishops and priests to focus on the spiritual role of the church, followed by social role. therefore the political role will have no room left, except if you consider defending a quality part of politics. i do not consider it so. >> is it your tendency now to try to pull the church a little bit out of politics? >> indeed. the church needs to remain out of politics. the church is a spiritual establishment. that's its primary role. it's also a social role to offer
to live in the privatized environment and not care about the civic situation. that is truly damaging to the possibility of already beleaguered ideals. nothing is simple. i cover the former soviet union and russia. i could go on at great length about how boris yeltsin undermined democracy and became a hero democracy. lech walnsa in many ways was not the. working bloke many made him not to be. gorbachev was a visionary who came to power. he saw he needed to change the country. he used his powers to do that. he withdrew from afghanistan. he called for nuclear abolition. he worked with ronald reagan. he understood you need political solutions, not military solutions. when the soviet troops were ready to come out of the barracks so the berlin wall would not come down, he told them to stay in the barracks, the empire is going. we cannot be a country that will be one of glasnost and perestroika if we live the way we have. it is the 20th anniversary of the soviet union, the end of the soviet union. many people in russia blame him for the economic conditions in which they live. they blame him
and jenna is there doing makeup, it's a really fun environment and i want girls to feel as comfortable as they can. i have all different types of women that come to me for photos. mostly it is for a gift for their husband or boyfriend. we have a lot of brides that do it as a gift for their fiance and their wedding. i have girls that come in that just have smokin' bodies and want to have pictures taken. so there's definitely a wide range of girls that approach me. >> how much does a bed dior photo shoot cost someone? >> the cost is $350 and with that you get an hour and a half to two-hour session which includes your hair fully done, full makeup and as well as ten fully edited images after your session is completed. >> two cats, one cup of food. ♪ ♪ >>> coffey anderson is a christian singer and he wants to put on a good show, but this time -- ♪ >> here he is singing on new year's in irving, texas. he's on stage. who runs out, his little boy ran out. hug daddy's leg. >> oh. he's got a little paci in his mouth, t-shirt and no pants and high tops. >> he starts dancing and dances the w
bandas at the san diego zoo. they give them this extraordinary living environment and are obviously taking very good care of the little guy. >> that has to be one of the greatest guys. >> can you imagine? >> to get to play around with this panda cub. >>> i've got a couple of vehicles to check out. the first one from poland. guy's waiting for his bud toy come down the street to pick him up. carp's moving kind of slow. looks kind of wonky. doesn't it? >> what? >> yo what's up? >> itting loose like he wraps that car around a pole or something. the car still running, although probably a little out of line. >> is this his first car, he doesn't care about having wheels, doesn't kwhar it looks like? >> i think he just doesn't want to get rid those awesome seats. hey, buddy, i'm going to be a little late. i'll so when you i get there. >> you'll see, i'll be the one driving sideways. >> two maracas. that is not video trickery nap is actually a conjoined jeep wrangler. >> what? >> so they meld them together. this is reportedly in morocco. foreign diplomat who decided he wanted something uniqu
world environment. and the lingering allegations of corruption, nepotism, hangs over his head. >> his brother and father were assassinated, so in some ways he's also trying to stay alive in that country. and facing that possibility, as well. it's been a contentious relationship with karzai over the years. he's had better relationships with some of the generals there like general stanley mcchrystal than he has with others. and i talked with pentagon officials yesterday who were saying they weren't sure how these meetings were going to go because you just never know when you're dealing with president karzai what you're going to get. and in fact i even e-mailed a couple days ago the folks i met in afghanistan during previous trips and they were somewhat concerned, as well, saying they weren't exactly sure what karzai was going to say while he was here with president obama because a lot of people in afghanistan especially some of the leaders there still very much want u.s. troops because they're fully aware that the afghan forces are not going to be ready by the end of next year. >> absol
a short break. if you feel like you work in a toxic environment but don't know what to do about it -- how is that for a segue? ken linder written a new book called "your killer emotions." best way to navigate your way is to keep emotions in check. we'll talk to him, up next. geico's emergency roadside assistance is there 24/7. oh dear, i got a flat tire. hmmm. uh... yeah, can you find a take where it's a bit more dramatic on that last line, yeah? yeah i got it right here. someone help me!!! i have a flat tire!!! well it's good... good for me. what do you think? geico. fifteen minutes could save you fifteen percent or more on car insurance. >>> everybody has a moment where you get upset and you do something you regret. our next guest says he knows how to control those urges and lead to a successful personally at work. he has a new book "your killer emotions: seven steps to mastering the toxic impulses that sabotage you." good morning. >> good morning, soledad. >> i'm guessing you work with hostile people on both sides of the negotiation and there are lots of people who think anger and emot
today it will still be a dangerous environment. we will still need to do force protection, but the mission will change this is how we start to leave and it will happen as of this spring which is a surprise. faster than anybody said it would happen. now, the justification for speeding up the way out, i have to admit, is a little holey. holey with an "e," not ah. this is because of the progress that's been made in terms of after began security forces, capacity to take the lead. i don't really know anything about the strength of afghan security forces and neither do you, unless you are just back from the war, which case, welcome home. but the pentagon's report to congress on that subject which reportedly was ready before the election this year, but did not get released until after the election for some reason, the official u.s. pentagon report on the readiness of afghan security forces, far from afghan security forces ready to take the lead, out of 23 afghan army brigades, only one of those 23 brigades capable of operating independently without support from international or u
be a dangerous environment, that we will still need to do force protection. but the mission is going to change. this is how we start to leave. and it's going to happen as of this spring, which is a surprise, which is faster than anybody said it was going to happen. now, the justification for speeding up the way out, i have to admit, is a little holey, not holy as in ahh. president obama saying the acceleration was possible in part because of what has been made in terms of afghan security forces, their capacity to take the lead. i don't know anything about afghan security forces, and neither do you unless you're newly back from the war, and welcome home, but the pentagon's report on that suggest which was reportedly ready before the election this year, but did not get released until after the election for some reason, the official pentagon support on the readiness of afghan security forces says far from afghan security forces being ready to take the lead, it says out of 23 afghan army brigades, only one of those 23 brigades is capable of operating independently without support from internationa
an environment of better economic growth. rates might go higher. we think the immediate part of the curve is probably the safest place for the investors who are looking or think rates might be going up. then the other is you need to play the revenue space. there's a lot of high quality credits out there. but the yields are low. you're not really getting compensated. from a risk reward perspective, like health care and transportation, like housing and education offer a lot of value with not a lot of risk. >> so tell me how the fed plays into all of this, peter. there was all that noise last week about the division among fed members on how long the stimulus program should continue or will continue. if rates stay low and they don't fall any further, what's the impact of the growth in the muni bond market? how does that play into it? >> that's a great question. that's one we're talking about here as well. i think it's important to realize that the fed was only beginning to talk about having a debate or a discussion about removing that qe. so they've been anchoring on the long end of the marke
environment. which renewables in particular do you see having that sort of potential? is it wind, solar, wave, geothermal? >> the kind of numbers i'm talking about, you double energy demand in the world and supply 30% of it from renewables from say 1% or 2%. >> where will it come from? >> certainly wind is part of that, maybe solar -- there's some optimism there's in breakthroughs potentially coming there. i think ultimately hydrogen may be on the table as part of that answer. i will say all of these are important. all of these potentially fill some of that space. they all need additional technology applied to them and we have to come down the cost curve. it's always interesting to look at what we as a company do. i'll tell you our focus right now when it comes to the emissions space and the idea why we would push renewables, our focus is around carbon -capturing storage and around biofuels, particular types of biofuels that meet this low co-2 potential standpoint. and we have a wind business but to be perfectly frank, it's not growing very fast. >> i hope we'll come back to this but let's mo
dangerous environment. >> reporter: so far searchers have come up empty, but they hope he's stuck in a tree or lost and waiting to be found. clayton sandell, abc news, denver. >> clayton, thanks to you tonight. >>> we'll move on to the biggest headline in sports right now. alabama and notre dame, the bcs championship. and the audience will be as giant as the game. "good morning america's" josh elliott is there. ♪ >> reporter: it's the super bowl of college games, a national championship arguably as anticipated as any in the sport's history. >> to be the best, you've got to beat the best. >> reporter: number two alabama playing for their second straight national title and what would be its third in four years. and so a dynasty in the making. >> to win another one, oh, man, it speaks highly of our program and what we do around here. >> reporter: standing in their way? a resurgent and unbeaten notre dame, looking for its first national title in a quarter century. >> it would be a good time for us to win this championship. >> reporter: the fighting irish stand on history's doorstep thanks in
that come with that. the stewardship of the environment. we have enormous interest of course in our own resources, our people. in fact, 40% of canada's landmass is above the 60th parallel, yet we all have roughly 100,000 of our 34 million people living there. so it is an enormous challenge, obligation, even to continue to exert the sovereignty, search and rescue. at this time of year is becoming dark 24 hours a day. you have temperatures to plummet below 50 degrees celsius. and you have opening waters and changes that are going to create a lot of challenges because more people simply are going to go there, and more countries have exerted or expressed an interest. you mentioned china. there are many others that want to be part of this council. to your question about the obligation, i think it comes back to people playing by the rules and respecting the fact that there are places when disputes arise, as is the case with canada and the united states impact on the bering sea. some of the bordering areas of the arctic. i think there is a recognition that countries that adhere to a rule of a
campaigning for the environment. he says becoming a grandparent just makes that more important. he also says he worries every night because his sons don't just honor the military, they serve in it. in a rare interview, prince charles says he feels he will have to answer to his royal grandchild on the state of the environment. >> you are soon to be a grandfather for the first time, so many congratulations. >> i don't want to be confronted by my future grandchild, why didn't you do something? it makes it even more obvious to try to make sure that we leave them something that isn't a total -- >> reporter: environmental causes, something he shared with his children, growing organic vegetables on his farm and recently had an endangered frog named after him. >> we present you with a frog. >> reporter: but prince charles heir to the throne is also a military parent. immediate worry is prince harry serving as an apache helicopter pilot in afghanistan. in september his base was attacked by the taliban. it's his second tour of duty. >> if you are a parent or, you know, relation and the person is away
in this current fiscal environment to ensure the success of the space launch? >> thank you, sir. that is a tall order. i think one of the crucial things the consolation program was supposed to do is to provide a smooth transition for the work force and for the capability the nation has off of the shuttle program to what ever came next. and we've lost that now. the deep integration between the low earth orbit and the destinations that was hoped for i think is also gone. i would first say 2012 is not 2008. we are in a different and new situation today and we have to look at going forward. the primary, one of the primary problems with the end of the constellation was again cutting ourselves off from our international partners who didn't see how they were going to participate increasing risks to the international space station because while we certainly hope for and encourage and want to see the private sector to go for that work if there are delays, if there are problems, we don't really have a fallback option so we are down to a few critical paths for supporting the station, and so, the complemen
you would look at the material? >> we are all products of our experience, of our environment where we come from. i have been tempered by that experience about war. what war means, the consequences, who has to fight it. all of that experience is part of me and how i look at policy, how i look at our foreign policy, how i look at our military policy, how i judge consequences, how the world sees us, their trust in our purpose, in our power. no question that much of the questioning i've done about iraq even before we went in was conditioned tempered by that experience in vietnam. and whatever i will do in my life, whether it's in politics or outside, those experiences shape me just like anyone who has gone through war, those experiences shape you very much. one of the things it does is it makes you less inclined i suspect to jump into war. it's easy to get into war, not very easy to get out as evidenced by the johnson tapes. and you need to think through these things. diplomacy is critically important especially in the world we flive today. i think something else is important here and cer
feinstein, chairman of intelligence, patty murray, chair budget. barbara boxer, chair of the environment. seven women for ranking members on the house committee. on the republican side? every major committee is led by a white male. in fact there is only one woman sharing a minor committee in the house. so, what does this mean? does it really matter? it changes the conversation that the negotiation table. senator gillibrand often tells the story of serving on the armed services committee. when they were talking about military readiness, she and women like daddy giffords were there to rest questions about personnel and mental health programs for the troops and their families at home. you cannot tell me that if we had two or three women involved in the fiscal cliff debate over the last month that we would not have gotten through it faster. i was at home over the hollow eyes with my father. we knew where we would end up. we knew that there would be tax increases. but women just want to get these things done and keep moving forward. these republican men, john boehner in particular, tend to wa
blocks away from her and my whole environment was drug, violence and chaos. and that's all i knew. but when i met laura, my whole life changed and it changed for the better. >> did you have a hard time thinking this lead is actually going to take me to eat and she's going to walk in central park with me and she's going to take me to a place and buy me the first steak i have ever had in my life? what were you thinking as an 11-year-old boy in the same sweat pants that you wore all the time because it's all you had? >> i thought that she was a godsend. i thought, you know, someone was looking over me to send me an angel. and that's what i believe. i believe the lord sent me an angel when he sent me laura. >> no question. as i read the story, and it's just so compelling, laura, did you expect this to turn into a 26 year relationship? at what point did you realize this is not just me taking a kid out to lunch? >> well, you know, you never could imagine that when we met that day that maurice would not only change my life, but i would change his life and ultimately there would be such a
and do little for the environment. in seattle, dan springer, fox news. >>> i'm shanea and this is the fox report. the fiscal cliff is now history but another brewing battle in the nation's capitol looms on the horizon. this time raising the country's $16.4 trillion spending limb. we hit that number earlier this week and the treasury department says if no deal can be reached to raise the limit in the next two months our nation will know longer be able to pay its bills. the battle lines appear already drawn. republicans say reducing spending is the only way to cut into the nation's bloated deficit. president obama in the meantime says he will not compromise over his calls to congress to raise the debt ceiling without negotiations. senior affairs, white house correspondent starts with this. the president has warned congress several times not to tie the debt ceiling talks to spending cuts. is he persuading any republicans? >> doesn't look like it, shannon, because they are shaping up for another fight in a matter of weeks. technically the government ran out of money the end of the year. secre
. what sort of environment are we looking at in terms of what assad might do next? >> it is extremely chaotic and unpredictable. because of the internationalization, much has been said this is part of war. with the money coming into it and the weapons, money from the gulf country to the rebels. it is a regional conflict. the fighting is taking place and has regional complications. >> chemical weapons. i believe his statement is he said earlier he is alluding to the chemical weapons and said it could involve u.s. troops saying you have to keep the possibility that if there is a peaceful transition and international organizations get involved that they might ask for assistance in that situation. so defense secretary paneta discussing troops and the weapons. >> for u.s. and israel, they hinted at the fact that they would use force if they needed to ensure them is it falling into the hands of people that could be dangerous. dictators use chemical weapons. in a moment of desperation if this regime feels its back is against the wall and time is running out it may resort to the weapons. >> h
environment. the nature of our debate of cyber has been the digital pearl harbor. the greater national security threat is the gradual loss of intellectual property. it is effort by a thousand cuts. part of the challenge at 35 is not just scaling costs but the leakage through cyber theft, which does not mean someone else can build it but they are gaining knowledge and capacity in a way they would not have been able to. something that may have given you a ten-year advantage does not give you that kind of advantage at technological capacity. >> i would like to tie it back to our economy and jobs. president obama said the focus would be to increase jobs. i come back to paul. you said that the success of our [indiscernible]channel some of the budget from the dod to the state department. i take this time to say that hillary clinton is coming back to work today. i wish her great recovery. if we have projected our intent is to china and the world. looking at the way china has been aggressive many ways in the south china sea. [indiscernible]how do we look into that without freedom of navigation
to their environment, office furniture, software needed -- which nevwhenever thy to support the core for environment. at that time i was hired with the company. i was working seven days a week nonstop as all over corporations were installing $15 million systems like you would go out and buy a pack of gum. i think taxation against large corporations is what is part of our problem in this country right now. i believe if we would give them an incentive to be able to do that got onhighere and penalizing them for being successful, i think we would have a lot better environment economically. basically this all ties to the tax deductions that everyone is looking at, and i heard rumblings of a simple tax. well, we're not in a position right now to offer that. it sounds like a great idea, but something that would have to evolve over time. my point i am trying to make on the obama care thing, and i did not mention that, but i feel it they had a corporate tax, not a loophole, but basically a did nation tax, corporations could do a fund that would support a medical plan and the country, we would not have the co
. it costs a lot of money. in this case it is also costing the environment. >>steve: thanks for the cheery report. >> i was at the redskins game so i'm in a bad news. i'm hosting varney together. we're going to have grover norquist. we're going to give him a heart time because i say this fiscal cliff might have been his waterloo. >>steve: in a couple of minutes, the former marine who wrote a scathing letter to dianne feinstein will join us live. >>gretchen: matt damon wants us to believe that fracking is bad in his movie but a secret report says no fracking way. ♪ [ male announcer ] how could a luminous protein in jellyfish, impact life expectancy in the u.s., real estate in hong kong, and the optics industry in germany? at t. rowe price, we understand the connections of a complex, global economy. it's just one reason over 75% of our mutual funds beat their 10-year lipper average. t. rowe price. invest with confidence. request a prospectus or summary prospectus with investment information, risks, fees and expenses to read and consider carefully before investing. with investment informati
christians say the focus shouldn't be on gunnings but on the environment giving rise to this violence. >> instead of having as the nra proposes a policeman in every school, our policy should be focusing on getting a dad in every home. >> reporter: vice president biden said friday he's glad i n evangelical groups have participated in his gun policy task force meetings because in the past they have been, quote, reluctant to engage on the gun issue. athena jones, cnn, washington. >>> the president is promising action when it comes to curbing gun violence. the vice president even expected to endorse efforts to reinstate that assault weapons ban, but the opposition says that just isn't going to happen. t spot, not easy to find, but worth it. but with copd making it hard to breathe, i thought those days might be over. so my doctor prescribed symbicort. it helps significantly improve my lung function starting within five minutes. symbicort doesn't replace a rescue inhaler for sudden symptoms. with symbicort, today i'm breathing better. and that means...fish on! symbicort is for copd includi
out of your comfort zone, the environment is so rich. >> by the same token, people who might be liberals or conservatives do at least have an enemy they can identify with, which was not always possible in the age of walter cronkite. with one solo voice. >> that had enemies, they just were not on television. when you think about it, consider walter cronkite, known to many in the day as uncle walter. it would be ludicrous to call any newscaster a relative today. can you imagine anybody trying to get away with a presumptuous statement like "and that's the way it is." everybody craved the comfort of that dinnertime slice of consensus reality. i think that the more media do you think cable tv and that that kind of comfort? >> i think that the more media sources you have dividing up the audience, the smaller the public square becomes. less consensus, but you are exchanging that comfort for the comfort of knowing that there are other people like you in the world who care about the things that you care about. i am always in favor of more speech, rather than less, even though everythi
are naturally curious and are willing to venture out of your comfort zone, the environment is so rich. if you want to be hermetically sealed, that option is available to you, too. >> people who might be liberals or conservatives to at least have an enemy they can identify with which was not an pot -- which was not possible in the age of walter cronkite, with one solo voice of television mainstream journalism. >> they had enemies, they were just not on television. consider walter cronkite. known to many in the day as uncle walter. it would be little as -- ludicrous to call in the news anger and relative to date. it would be arrogant to end every newscast with the phrase, "and that's the way it is." can you imagine anybody try to get away with that presumptuous statement? yet it was his sign off and everybody believed it and quit the comfort of that dinner time slice of consensus reality. >> do you think cable tv and the that kind of comfort -- ended that kind of comfort? >> not initially. the more media sources you have dividing up the audience, the smaller the public prayer becomes. the let's
diversity and we are in a tough political environment. with key cabinet picks already announced, the defense, state, and cia, the shift is now on others. >> does he settle on these names or still sifting through tough choices? >> he will make an announcement when he makes a decision. >> reporter: timothy geithner is expected to leave and although wall street and progressives are he can pressed concerns. someone with business expertise and with lisa jackson departing the environmental protection agency, a replacement is needed for her, too. it's a second-term ritual that douglas brinkley is often -- >> they pick people they wish they could have picked the first time around but you can't with the politics of a campaign when you're first making to the white house. >> reporter: climate is still a factor. susan rice withdrew her name to replace hillary clinton under pressure over her actions after the benghazi attacks. >> i think the political climate matters a lot now with who you pick. it shouldn't but it does. >> reporter: and there's pressure under the president to consider diversity after a
is to continue to keep people at home in an environment that they feel most comfortable with as opposed to an institution. so we measure in our organization readmission rates. i mentioned that we've reduced 26% readmission rates. the goal there is to continue to encourage people to stay home and be able to take care of them at home. that helps with that waste in that regard. the ability to not have duplicated diagnostic services are an example of that. and someone overlooking the whole individual has that observation as opposed to the silos. >> but we go back to the medicare for a second? >> uh-huh. >> where is that waste, and what have you seen as an organization the waste being and how would you suggest that that be tackled? >> okay. um, the waste is across the platform. i mean, i think if you this week there was an article in "the new york times" around fraud and some of the activities that are going on in that area. so fraud's a component of that. but for us as an organization the largest waste is the lack of integrated care. and what that means is duplication of services and where
? >> about $135. and you go online and cut out the middleman. it's an a wholesale environment. that might be $250 above. people really respond to that and everybody can appreciate a value. >> a good story. a couple buddies making good. >> 200%. >> congratulations on ledbury and on your baby, more important. >>> coming up next, the president on the council of foreign relations. richard haass of the romney campaign, dan senore, much to talk about. also, mayor michael bloomberg of new york city and mika's dad, dr. brzezinski. >> well done, willie. with the spark cash card from capital one, sven gets great rewards for his small business! how does this thing work? oh, i like it! [ garth ] sven's small business earns 2% cash back on every purchase, every day! woo-hoo!!! so that's ten security gators, right? put them on my spark card! why settle for less? testing hot tar... great businesses deserve great rewards! [ male announcer ] the spark business card from capital one. choose unlimited rewards with 2% cash back or double miles on every purchase, every day! what's in your wallet? here's your
something like libya, chaos, bad acting, all things of -- all kinds of things can happen in that environment. host: early in this conflict, you and others wrote about the family dynamics in the the assad family. his mother is still alive, and by many accounts, calling the shots behind the scenes. can you elaborate? guest: i have not heard that. it is a family affair. his father ruled syria for many years pdt killed 30,000 syrians in putting in -- for many years. he killed 30,000 syrians. the security forces have held tight around him. his mother calling the shots -- i'm not aware of that. host: one of our viewers saying i would prefer the position of switzerland. no one seems interested in blowing up their cities. a position that continues to percolate -- a position that continues to percolate in this country. est: people who read -- our leaders read it such. they go into a full retrenchment, retreat view. world is a very chaotic place right now. you have a people associated with the arab spring. you have the euro crisis. you have a global recession. you have a rising china. it is a very a
. [video clip] >> we are all products of our experience and environment. i have been tempered by the experience about war. what war means, the consequences, who has to fight it. all of that experience is part of me and how i look at policy, how i look at our foreign policy and military policy, how i judge consequences, how the world sees us, their trust in our purpose in power. no question much of the questioning i have done about iraq and was tempered by the experience in vietnam. whenever i will ever do in my life -- whatever i will do in my life, those experiences shaped me, just like anyone who has gone through war. those experiences shape you very much. it makes you less inclined to jump into war. it is easy to get into war, not very easy to get out, as evidenced by the johnson tapes. you need to think through these things. diplomacy is critically important, especially in the complicated world we live in today. i think something else is important here and a lesson we learned from vietnam. what is going to be very important for america is not to isolate ourselves in the wo
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